Writing vs. Life

First disclaimer, there isn’t an image with this blog because the hotel wifi won’t upload anything other than text.  Today’s events have brought me to a serious realization; sometimes writing and life don’t gel.

The backstory:

I have the day off.  I am prepared to write, update my Kickstarter campaign, do some work on social media and cook a great dinner for my family…with laundry and dishes done.   My apartment starts to smell like I mopped the floor with acetone, particularly in my son’s room as I am laying him down for his nap.  I see workers leaving my neighbor’s apartment wearing respirators… well, poop.  I decide to head with my son to Circle (known to the rest of the world as Target) and kill some time, hoping the noxious fumes will dissipate and I can resume my daily tasks.

After 2 hours at Circle (spending an undisclosed amount of money on things I don’t need) and 45 minutes at Donald’s (known to the rest of the world as McDonald’s), I return home to find the smell worse than before to the point my son starts complaining that his head and stomach both hurt.  Yay!  My neighbor has apparently decided to have her bathtub refinished and walls painted with oil-based paint without proper ventilation.  I could A. stay home and start hallucinating about purple donkeys and listening to my refrigerator sing Smiths songs or B. Get my son out of a potentially dangerous situation and get a hotel room.   I chose B.  We have a large retail buyer’s market going on this week, meaning there are virtually ZERO hotel rooms available near home.  After a bit of travel and four chocolate chip cookies, I am here in our noxious fume-free hotel room.  My son is currently rolling on the floor, refusing to sleep.

Writing is a very complex action. It comes to some quite naturally but still requires a modicum of effort.  Life always seems to insert itself right in the middle of the creative flow.  I applaud writers who can work while being stay-at-home parents, who write after working a full or part-time job all day or while attending school.  All the dishes, extra shifts, trips to the grocery store, or inconsiderate neighbors can be taxing and most definitely be stifling.  On the upside, having completed a novel despite relocating back to the US from England, having a difficult pregnancy, postpartum depression, a full-time job with opposite hours than my husband, and a fear of rejection, makes me all the prouder of it.  The Adventures of the Flying Furniture: The Return of the Great Flyer was no modest feat and I am truly, truly excited to be on the cusp of publishing.  No re-enameled bathtubs or slow hotel wifi can take that away.

The Kickstarter campaign for the first novel reached it’s goal of 20% funding in the first week.  There are three weeks left and I want to keep the momentum going.  Feel free to share the campaign with friends and it you have not, take a look at the campaign yourself.  It’s definitely worth a look.  FLYING FURNITURE ON KICKSTARTER

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Why does Myra like oranges so much?

FF kickstarter pledge FB cover

I am a little stuck on Myra, so we will talk a bit more about her today.  She is extremely complex and has been one of the most satisfying characters to develop.  Her appearance indicates nothing more than weakness but that also makes her stealthy.  She can sneak up on you.  She is a hustler like Forest Whittaker in the Color of Money, completely unassuming.  She loves a man with every ounce of her soul who does not and most likely, will not love her back.  The saddest aspect of Myra is that she hangs on with this thin little string of hope to any chance that Henry might see her as something more than a nuisance.  I keep her close to me as she is one of the most emotional characters to write.

Anyhow, Myra loves oranges.  Much like Watteau’s dogs, Oranges are peppered throughout the novels, popping up here and there.  Why does Myra like oranges?  Oranges are exotic.  Their sweet smell is reminiscent of far away places that are warm and sunny.  Myra longs to break free.  She is a prisoner of her own fear, her loyalty to her father, Roman Hatfield, and as a child, her illnesses. She dreams of traveling to white beaches kissed by blue waters, of starting over in a place where nobody knows her.  She could reinvent herself.  Oranges are Myra’s dreams.  She is pivotal in each story line, much like a swing vote in an election. BUT, ultimately Myra loves oranges because Henry does.

Myra’s role shifts late in the first novel:

“Thank you, Myra,” Lucy said sweetly, “for keeping Henry company and for being such a true and loyal friend.”  Myra blushed.  “You are most welcome, Miss Martin,” she replied.  “Oh please,” Lucy interrupted, “no formalities necessary here.  Call me Lucy.  I sincerely hope that one day soon, that I may call you a friend as well.”  Myra’s cheeks turned an even deeper shade of red.  She had never boasted many friends.  In fact, she had never had a single one outside of Henry, who was always a bit fickle until now. Myra hoped that she might find joy in her newfound friendship and would find someone with whom to share her heart, just like Lucy and Henry.  She loved Henry with all her soul but she knew that she must let him go and forge a new path.  She wanted so desperately to believe what Henry had told her, that she was stronger than she knew…

The one concern with Myra’s newfound role as spy is whether or not Henry is treating her as if she were expendable.  Is he more apt to put her in situations that could cause her harm than he is with Lucy?  Ultimately their fates are my choice but most times it is as if the characters make their own decisions, I merely tell their stories…

Don’t forget our Kickstarter Campaign runs through October 24th.  Check out our new website FlyingFurnitureAdventures.